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AUTO: MAY 29 IndyCar - Indianapolis 500

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If you do not know much about the Indy 500 we have some fun facts for you!

The Indy 500 is a famous car race that takes place in Speedway, Indiana. It’s like a big celebration with fast cars zooming around a track at speeds around 230 mph.

This race has been happening for a long time, and it’s a special part of Indiana’s history.

Imagine hearing the roar of the engines and feeling the energy of the crowd as cars race towards the finish line—it’s a thrilling event loved by many!

Take a look below at our 10 fun facts on the Indy 500 to help you survive any conversation about the race this May!

1. The Indy 500 is the world’s largest single-day sporting event and draws more than 300,000 people every year.

AUTO: MAY 29 IndyCar - The 106th Indianapolis 500 Source:Getty

In 2022 The Indianapolis Motor Speedway had over 325,000 fans attend the Indy 500!

2. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway, where the race is held, spans an impressive 253 acres.

May 29th, 2016 -- DigitalGlobe's GeoEye-1 Satellite captured this amazing image at 12:31 pm, moments after the start of the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500. (Photo DigitalGlobe via Getty Images) Source:Getty

3. Over the course of its 100+ year history, the Indy 500 has been won by 75 different drivers.

AUTO: JUL 30 NTT INDYCAR Series Gallagher Grand Prix Source:Getty

The first winner in 1911 was American racer Ray Harroun, and the most recent winner is Jozef Newgarden in 2023.

4. Hélio Castroneves, A. J. Foyt, Rick Mears, and Al Unser share the record for the most victories at the Indy 500 with four each.

2023 Acura Grand Prix Of Long Beach Source:Getty

A list of the four drivers that have won four Indy 500’s and what year they won:

Hélio Castroneves years won – 2001, 2002, 2009, and 2021

A. J. Foyt years won – 1961, 1964, 1967, and 1977

Rick Mears years won – 1979, 1984, 1988, and 1991

Al Unser years won – 1970–71, 1978, and 1987

5. During World War II, the speedway was used as a training ground for military aviators who sat in their planes while they circled around its 2.5 mile oval track at high speeds to simulate battle conditions in Europe and Asia.

Aerial view of Indianapolis Motor Speedway with airplane wing Source:Getty

6. Ray Harroun won the very first Indy 500 in 1911 with an average speed of 74.59 mph.

Ray Harroun Winning Indy 500 Source:Getty

7. Scott Dixon holds a record for most laps led in the Indy 500.

2023 Acura Grand Prix Of Long Beach Source:Getty

8. The Borg-Warner Trophy has been awarded to winning drivers since 1936.

AUTO: MAY 28 IndyCar - The 106th Indianapolis 500 Drivers Meeting Source:Getty

One of the Most Coveted Trophies in the World of Sports

The Borg-Warner Trophy pays tribute to many of the most revered drivers in auto racing history year-round, but during the month of May it becomes the focal point for the drivers attempting to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race. It is a reminder of the glory and tradition associated with winning the fabled event.

With victory at the Indianapolis 500 comes the honor of having one’s face sculpted onto the 79-year-old trophy. Separate squares are affixed to its sterling-silver body, on which each winner’s face, name and winning year are permanently etched. A silversmith is commissioned each year to create the new champion’s portrait/sculpture in bas-relief for placement on the trophy.

  • Trophy height without base: 52 inches
  • Trophy height with base: 64.75 inches (or 5 feet, 4.75 inches)
  • Trophy weight with base: Approximately 110 pounds

To learn more on the Borg-Warner trophy visit IMS.com.

9. The winner of the Indy 500 is traditionally presented with a wreath and a bottle of milk.

106th Running Of The Indianapolis 500 Source:Getty

10. In 1992 Al Unser came really close to winning his third consecutive Indy 500 title.

Racer Al Unser Sr. at Long Beach Grand Prix Race 1985 Source:Getty

Unser’s bid to become the first three-time consecutive Indy 500 champion was thwarted when he finished second to Mark Donohue in the 1972 Indianapolis 500.

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